Thursday, 6 March 2014

Off the Tracks

Lance Hattatt and Rafael González Paz: the gateway of Colonia del Sacramento

Had there been a railway, then we should have travelled to Colonia del Sacramento by train. But, alas, the Central Uruguay Railway, in British control from 1878 until Nationalisation in 1948, is no more and so, per force, we resorted to the bus.

a woman seen through an open doorway sits patiently beside her Christmas Tree
a cobbled street within the Old Town leads down towards the River Plate and the sea

Some three hours later, our route having taken us along avenues of palm trees, we alighted in the old quarter, designated a World Heritage Site, of this historic town where shady squares, cobbled streets and quiet alleys gave voice to a time having stood still.

the vibrancy and colour of South America is reflected in the interior of this small café

A set of tickets, purchased to give entrance to all museums, proved an unwise buy. Firmly closed for the summer holidays, we could only speculate as to what lay behind those locked doors. From the top of a lighthouse we wished ourselves across the still waters of the River Plate to where the distant spires of Buenos Aires rose visible through the haze of heat.

foiled once more as yet another museum advertises itself closed for the summer holidays
snapshots taken in the restaurant after a long lunch - a welcome respite from the heat
across a stretch of the River Plate, seen from the lighthouse, the city of Buenos Aires

Once more on terra firma we lingered over lunch, befriended stray cats, pressed our noses to the glass of unshuttered windows, wrote on picture postcards, scorned souvenirs, snapped snapshots and painted our lips red. Later, as the shadows of the day lengthened, we clambered over rocks, hunted for sea shells and, as all travellers do, dreamt dreams.

looking out to sea from the shore but, in fact, at the very edge of the River Plate 
 
in the late afternoon sun on the banks of the River Plate at Colonia del Sacramento

186 comments:

  1. oh I wish I could have walked those stone streets with you. There is something about stone that people have touched and worked that quiets me as I behold it. Sorry to hear about the closed museums....rascals probably knew it.......oh well, your trip looks divine. You show me that someone really does live a good life of textures
    and you befriended the stray cats...bless you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Colonia del Sacramento is most definitely a most attractive town, especially the old quarter which appears largely unchanged over the centuries. Yes, having been sold the tickets, we were most disappointed to find the museums closed and, like you, expect that they knew!!

      Delete
  2. I visited Sitges to go to the El Greco museum as part of my art history degree travel project - only to find it was closed for four years for renovation! Pre internet era notwithstanding I still think my tutors took a dim view of my research capabilities.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How really frustrating for you. And, as you say, to be closed for four years must have meant that there was little chance of redeeming the situation. How we have all come to rely on the internet!

      Delete
  3. love the gateway entrance; what a great trip you had despite the closures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The gateway was most attractive, Linda, and it was possible to climb onto the ramparts, which we did!!

      Delete
  4. The atmosphere and scenery were obviously enough to make the trip worthwhile. I do sympathize with you about the closings, something that has always dogged me when traveling: Westminster Abbey, the Folger Library, La Brea Tar Pits the Legion of Honor--all still waiting for the Next Time.
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The closure of all the museums, particularly as we had tickets, was a little frustrating, Jim, but just one of those things. Like you, we have plenty of places lined up for the Next Time. Certainly an incentive to return.

      Delete
  5. Dear Jane and Lance,
    What an adventure you had! Was it as humid as it looks? I like the look of that café - it does indeed have a South American flavor to it.
    What sort of museums did they have there?
    Bye for now,
    Kirk
    PS
    Did you get your money refunded? Or was it a case of caveat emptor...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually, Kirk, it was not really humid at all - we were fortunate - but very hot indeed, particularly in the middle of the day. The café was great fun - we went in it for a coffee. In truth all the museums we went into whilst in Uruguay were not that interesting and so we probably did not miss over much. Money back? Now you must be joking!

      Delete
  6. Your holiday sounds sublime. Your writing evokes something nostalgic, just as some of your pictures do, in particular the one with the cobbled stones. There is a feel of time standing still in some of them. And i love the last picture. Funny but also depicts how much you enjoyed your travels. Thank you for sharing it with us.

    Red

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really was such an adventure, Red, and so very different from anything which we have ever done before. Colonia del Sacramento is a most attractive town and we should certainly hope to revisit when we travel to Uruguay at the end of the year. The last picture was taken, as you may imagine, by Rafaelito standing above us. His toes!!

      Delete
  7. What marvelous photographs you share with your dear readers, and what adventures! I especially enjoyed the photograph of the cobbles leading to the river. Oh, and that last photograph is priceless. Resigned to resting in the heat of the day, exhausted, but contented.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There were many cobbled streets, nearly all of which ended at the river, with some delightful old houses which appear to have changed very little since they were built. We are delighted that you liked the last picture - we were uncertain about including it!

      Delete
  8. There's something of that atmosphere in some of the little towns of Honduras...but without the mighty River Plate!

    What a super place in which to spend the day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, until we were actually in Uruguay we had no idea of the width of the River Plate, possibly thinking of it as a larger Danube. At Montevideo it is almost 60 miles wide, but then you probably know that. Wonderful and just like the sea.

      Delete
  9. Love from me darling....x !...great adventure you have had !! wowwww...x !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How really sweet of you. And of course we return our love. xxx

      Delete
  10. What a very picturesque town, the gateway and the cobbled street look beautiful, and I think I would adore to while away some time in that very colourful cafe! The view across the river to Buenos Aires is stunning, and I just adore that final photo, so quirky and affectionate and funny and sweet! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Colonia del Sacramento is a very attractive town and the old part is particularly so. We fell in love with it as we did with all we saw of Uruguay. On our next visit, planned for the end of the year, we very much hope to take the ferry to Buenos Aires where, as it happens, we have friends. So glad that you like the final picture - it is fun!

      Delete
  11. Dear Jane and Lance,

    Reading your posts is always a delight. The two of you have the ability to visualise with words what you have been up to :-)!

    What a shame those museums were closed, but a chance to see the beach and relax! What more does one want.....Sun, sea, blue skies, good company.....sounds like heaven to me!

    Wishing you a happy weekend ahead!

    Your friend from Rotterdam (who is counting the weeks :-))!!

    Love,

    Madelief xox

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are always so kind, generous and warm spirited, dear Madelief, in all that you write and we so appreciate it.

      We were sorry to have missed out on the museums but, that said, we possibly saw more of the town than we might otherwise have done and that was an added bonus. And we enjoyed our time on the 'beach'.

      Happy weekend to you too - and it is not so long now. Cannot wait. xxx

      Delete
  12. What a magnificent river. It's hard for me to take in the fact that it's a river and not a sea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had a similar difficulty, Loree, particularly as it is tidal. At its mouth, where it flows into the South Atlantic, it is impossibly wide!

      Delete
  13. Good Evening Jane and Lance, The thought of palm trees, shady squares and cobbled streets..... mmm... just wonderful. A stroll down the cobbled streets would be so enjoyable, but in the heat, it would have to be a gentle stroll. It was such a shame that most of the museums were closed... I wonder what delights were hidden behind those closed doors.
    .... and what a lovely end to my visit, a photograph with you both looking very relaxed, resting in the shade, whilst gazing across the water.
    So lovely.
    Best Wishes
    Daphne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The palm trees in fact, Daphne, were amazing to us and at one point on the bus we drove through the most wonderful avenue of them which stretched for several miles.

      At times, throughout our stay in Uruguay, the heat was almost too much making it very difficult to venture outside in the middle of the day. But we did enjoy many evening walks.

      We are delighted that you liked the final picture - just a bit of fun!

      Delete
  14. I love the look of that cafe--you know there's fun going on there! And those cobbled streets look ancient. The last picture is wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was the colourful appearance of the café which drew us in for a coffee, Jen, and once inside we had such fun with the young couple working there.

      Delete
  15. Jane and Lance, I LOVE the composition of the last photo - sensible to be wearing your hats in that midday heat! Yes, Buenos Aires is also a fabulous city to visit - hope you get there next time - I guess I stood on the other side of the Rio de la Plata and was looking at where you were! Funny world isn't it?

    On my next trip I'll be keeping my fingers crossed that the Hermitage isn't closed the day we sightsee! Or even worse, that a war hasn't been declared!!!!!

    Thanks for stopping by as always.
    Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really the last photograph, Mary, was almost by chance. Rafaelito was standing at that moment above us and just thought to take a picture. How strange to think of your looking towards Uruguay from the other side of the river. Certainly we plan to go to Buenos Aires on our next visit at the end of the year.

      Our concern should not be whether or not the Hermitage will be open but will we be granted a visa to even get into Russia!!!!

      Delete
  16. I - we - need to go to Buenos Aires and die. I might even learn to tango, so I will take H.I. of course - it takes two, you know. We could pop over to Uruguay as well, I suppose. Lovely looking place.

    The Mad Boy is wearing leather shoes, I see. Not Crockett and Jones, but a start.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, Tom, you will appreciate that the tang in Uruguay is quite different from that in Argentina. Much more sedate, or so we are told!

      The Mad Boy has given up reading 'Tom Stephenson', deeply offended as he is about the trainers!!!!! And now this!!!! We shall hide your comment!

      Delete
  17. I always only knew this river by the name of Río de la Plata, and so it took me a moment to figure out that you were talking about the very same one. Stupid me!
    An enchanted day in an enchanted and enchanting place, that's for sure. Love the polka-dotted tablecloths in the café!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But that is so much more sophisticated and worldly, Meike, to know the name of the river in Spanish. Why is it that the British have to Anglicise foreign names?

      Yes, the café table cloths are so bright and fun looking.

      Delete
  18. What a lovely discovery, as I posted after ever-so-long, to find that your light was on, and the welcome mat out for new adventures.

    “. . .painted our lips red . ..” Now THAT conveys an intriguing image which no guidebook can equal---no sites or sights or Northern Lights could dangle so tantalizingly alluring as THAT thought. And no photos?

    I was just about to mention the rigid Revlon smile of the hostess-in-the-window, with her scarf and bazeer and carmined lips to match. I suppose they all deserted her to HER post, as well, to fend off hungry patrons who come for cake, and there’s no cake either.

    What a disappointing thing, to buy tickets and then be foiled by the absence of all you paid to see---did you return to your vendor for a refund? That’s like having opera tickets, and you’ve dressed and hired a car, and the entire troupe’s just up and gone to the seaside without notice. And nobody’d even mentioned that they MIGHT.

    But your never-ending good humour and enthusiastic spirits stand you well in such a let-down of expectations---you find the happiness of a child, climbing on rocks and peeking discreetly into windows, and you have a way of making even those into a high adventure. I smile every time I see that you’ve visited or posted on your own site, for it’s a bit of fun the world lacks when you’re away. I love that you have such a BIG life, such a wonderfully interesting colourful one, and indeed add such colour yourselves. You give my small, quiet, but rich-in-wonderful-things one ever more vivid threads in the everyday tapestry, and that’s a lovely blessing.

    rachel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. On reflection, Rachel, we just thought that not all our readers might be up to the painted lips and as for a photograph, well, too too telling!!

      We do have to agree that it rather looks as if there might be no cake. As it happens, there was the most delicious orange cake. But talking of lips, which we sort of were and were not, we love your description of the 'rigid Revlon smile'!!

      Actually we were rather less upset about the museums than might have been the case. The only one open, and where they sold us the book of tickets for them all, was exceedingly dull. Afterwards we learnt it was the best!!

      You are so very kind with what you say here. Like you, and here we are convinced that we are very similar, we do believe that the greatest joys and pleasures are to be found in the simplest of things, most of which require little in the way of money. Thank you for this lovely comment.

      Delete
  19. What an interesting place. I'd love to take a walk there.
    Then I was surprised to find that picture of Buenos Aires, the city where I was born.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How amazing to learn, Julia, that you were born in Buenos Aires. Should you find yourself back there, then you must definitely cross the river to Colonia del Sacramento.

      Delete
    2. I LOVE Colonia del Sacramento.
      I spent time there with my parents many times when I was a child. Every time I visited that place I wrote poems... it was a magical place.

      Delete
    3. I need to clarify something. When you wrote Colonia del Sacramento I thought it was a place in California. Because we normally call it Colonia. Then I realized where it was.

      Delete
    4. Please do not be at all concerned and how thoughtful of you to comment again. Colonia del Sacramento, to give it its full title, in Uruguay is often shortened to Colonia by the local population. We wrote it in full in an attempt to avoid any confusion!!!

      Delete
  20. Museums closed for the summer holidays, now that's a novelty! Love that photo of the small cafe, pretty sums up the charm and general character of South America.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We must confess that to close the museums at the height of the tourist season does not appear to make much sense.

      Yes, South America seems to us to be that land of vitality and colour; the café was not exceptional in this respect.

      Delete
  21. Dear Jane and Lance, another day, another adventure. I agree that 'to close the museums at the height of the tourist season does not appear to make much sense.' But then, if the world ran in any kind of orderly fashion where would the fun be? It's these little complexities and inconsistencies that make travel intriguing. Doesn't the European world shut down in August? Well, at least that's what I've heard.

    I love those cobbled streets in your photo and the idea of perching near the sea to dream dreams. Yes, I could go for that. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do so love what you say here, Yvette, about the world running in 'any kind of orderly fashion' [or rather not doing so!]. And it is true that is all these kinds of differences which make for interest and add zest to both travel and life. Certainly much of Hungary shuts down in August - not so the United Kingdom.

      Delete
  22. Dear Jane & Lance - It was necessary for me to check out the location of Colonia del Sacramento on Google maps, and now I have a better picture of where you were. The town appears to have a timeless relaxed quality to it showing influences from both its Portuguese and Spanish cultures.
    The last photo appears to reflect the end of a good day out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We really think that Colonia del Sacramento would be the kind of town to appeal to you, Rosemary, for it is full of history, much of which stems as you rightly remark from the Spanish and Portuguese. How kind of you to have the interest to locate its whereabouts.

      Delete
  23. Jane and Lance, your reporting is taking me to a dreamy place, where many surprises and beauty may be found. When not all goes to plan, but that's not really such a bother. Where a polka dot cafe seems to exist just for you and yours to have a coffee. Where cobblestones lead to a sea that is a river. Where there is an infiltrating sense of pleasure, and terrific photos can be taken so that others will know you actually did visit such a place.

    It's so grand to have you back in the land of posting.

    xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All of this is, as always, so very, very kind of you, Frances. As you say, when things do not exactly go to plan, it really does not matter. In fact very often the necessity of rethinking an activity can often lead to the unexpected and with it great interest and joy.

      Delete
  24. Dear Jane and Lance, loved you conquered your fears and took the flying machine to such a colorful locale. Love the photos, specifically the last one, it's especially wonderful.
    A child was visiting the farm and I invited her to climb into the hay loft. She said, "But I'm afraid" and I replied, "If you let your fears control you, your life is going to be very small."
    She looked up at me and said, "All right. I'll conquer my fear and do it anyway!"
    Then we went to the barn, climbed into the hay loft and had long looks out the windows.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra, your response to your child friend is so very much 'you' and also so terribly wise. We love this for in the pleasure of the whole event lies a lesson for life. And we imagine she was thrilled to be at the top of the hay loft.

      Delete
  25. Should I give you the benefit of the doubt in the last photo and assume you are staring out over the river and not 'dropped off'?

    It is certainly an interesting country. What a shame about the museums. I am sure the Castle funicular will be closed for maintenance when we visit. (actually I have checked when it closed each week)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, Andrew. Now what makes you think that we would take the occasional nap?!!

      Be prepared for Budapest where things do not always function as advertised, and sometimes do not function at all!!

      Delete
  26. Hello Jane and Lance, so very nice to meet you. What a lovely place to holiday. I like the old cobblestone street. How could you hurry down that street? Thanks so much for your recent visits to Olive Out. Really I am not myself these days but do hope for improvement soon. Olive

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And how very kind of you, Olive, to take the time and trouble to comment and to join us as a Follower. We are delighted to welcome you.

      We really do trust that you will soon start to feel more yourself. Take great care.

      Delete
  27. Wow Jane and Lance, I was completely enthralled in each word, caption and picture... it is too bad you missed out on the museums but there were so many other great sights that you got pictures of... I can see why you enjoyed yourself so much there :) Have a great Friday :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Launna, you really do say the nicest of things and we really appreciate your taking the time to comment especially as we are aware that things are not always easy for you.

      Have a wonderful and restful weekend yourself.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for the lovely comment on my blog, I really do think having spring so near is helping to change things around... this winter has been a lot harder than what we are used to enduring... I feel for others who have had it much worse... I can't wait to be free to just go out without thinking of what I might freeze off... :)

      Delete
    3. Apparently, Launna, some parts of the United States have had the most terrible winter - and it is not over yet. Today, after a cold start here in Budapest, the sun is coming up and it promises to be a lovely spring day. We are all so fortunate.

      Thank you so much for taking the time and trouble to reply; it is, as we hope you know, hugely appreciated.

      Delete
  28. What I love, Jane and Lance, is that you didn't really find a 'destination' in Colonia del Sacramento, but a sort of 'instead of' place.
    And that didn't faze you.
    You appear to have made the most of a rationed summer holiday. But as ever, you are trailblazers. I'm sure the rest of the traveling community will start pouring in, now you've been!
    You've taken it all in your stride. And you've shown beauty in an otherwise neglected part of the world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is such a good way of putting it, Faisal. An 'instead' place rather than a 'destination', and how much more satisfactory is that!

      We loved everything about Uruguay largely because for us its traditions and culture are so very different from that of Europe, or the Europe we know. It really does deserve to be better known.

      Delete
  29. The restaurant looks like so much fun. There are places quite similar down in the Mission in San Francisco but nothing like this in Portland. At least not that I've found so far but they say Portland imitates SF and SF imitates South America so perhaps it won't be long. And the cobbled street that leads down into the water! Is that you guys on the road down aways from the buildings? And of course the last picture is so cute, like looking down into someone else's life in an unplanned moment, catching up with time almost.

    I have really enjoyed your last two posts from around Buenos Aires. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What enormous fun that you have similar places in the United States even if, as yet, they have not reached your own area. We loved Uruguay for its colour, its relaxed way of life but, most of all, for its warm hearted people. And we are so pleased that you liked the final image which we very nearly did not include!

      Jó hétvégét!

      Delete
  30. Dearest Jane & Lance,

    The photography is dreamy. The last picture is spectacular and holds the viewer. You are the perfect travellers. In spite of being somewhat disappointed at the museums being shut you made the most of your days.
    I had this playing in the background as I read your post today and felt it fitting
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUV3Ueobr88

    Wishing you a weekend full of joy

    Helenxx


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are such a dear, Helen, to say this about the photography and this from someone who we know does understand how to compose and take a picture [and paint one!]. Our camera is the cheapest possible but works for us. What you do not see are the complete and utter failures!

      Another wonderful link. Such kindness. Thank you.

      Jó hétvégét!

      Delete
  31. You both seem to be having a marvelous time which is wonderful.
    Interesting how trains disappear and buses take their place.
    Your photos a lovely and captures that area of South America.
    Vibrant colours of the cafe, can't imagine putting those colours all together in our decor, but they can and get away with it. That is what makes things unique.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We did enjoy ourselves enormously, thank you, so much so that we have plans to return to South America at the end of the year. You are so right over the combination of such bright colours - we should never dare and, what is more, could never make it 'work'.

      Delete
  32. Great series of photos. I love that cobbled street!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so pleased that you enjoyed the post. The cobbled streets were everywhere in Colonia del Sacramento.

      Delete
  33. I am very glad that the old quarter has been designated a World Heritage Site. Otherwise, like the railway that once worked so well, it could all disappear under developers' sledges.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Old Town was, in the main, very well looked after and certainly gave all the appearance of having changed very little over time. But always there is a need to be watchful!

      Delete
  34. The slow tempo and languor are conveyed thru the photos and then confirmed when the museums were shut!! But I suppose the mood is part of the culture and just being there and absorbing the atmosphere is probably as cultural as a trip to a museum!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps this is what appeals to us so much about Uruguay, the slow pace of life compared with that of Europe. And we think that you are right, to experience the sense of place is most likely more than enough.

      Delete
  35. It was meant to be an idyllic day though funny to be sold tickets to closed museums. How lovely of you to go with the flow. Think I'm calmer just experiencing your post.

    The Louvre was closed due to a strike the few days I was in Paris so natch, never made it inside; no one there to even sell tickets. But I got to L'Orangerie instead and it remains the highlight of lovely memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, the whole ticket affair was very odd having been sold a book for entrance to all museums in the first one we visited, then only to discover the remainder closed.

      How disappointing for you that the Louvre was closed as, and of course you are aware of this, it does contain some wonderful treasures.

      Delete
  36. Lovely blog post. Shame about that book of museum tickets being sold to you :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Matthew. Such is life!!

      Delete
  37. Though difficult to walk on...and a bumpy ride...cobbled streets are a real treat. The last photo conveyed a lazy relaxed time...sounds so enjoyable...janey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We rather regret that many of the cobbled streets of Budapest have been taken up and replaced with tarmacadam. Happily in Colonia del Sacramento this is not the case.

      Delete
  38. I realised you were back in the blogging world a couple of weeks ago, when Annie (Alacala ) mentioned you. So glad to see you are still enjoying life to the full, except of course for those closed museums. Lovely to see you here again. J

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How very kind of you, Janice. We note that you too have been on very extensive travels but clearly have had the most wonderful time.

      Yes, it was rather a pity about the museums. But there is always another time.

      Delete
  39. What a fascinating place, dear Jane and Lance. The Old Quarter so full of history and I love the vibrant cafe with the piano hoisted up high on a shelf - such fun! The River Plate is astonishing, more like a sea than a river and the last photo is so clever - upside down by the river. Bad luck with the museums - we have been caught out in similar fashion when travelling in the wrong 'season'! A lovely interesting post, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We too felt that the café was something rather special, Patricia, and therefore had to be included. The coffee was also good!!

      We too had no previous idea of the size of the River Plate. In Montevideo, which is situated at the mouth of the river where it flows into the South Atlantic, it is always referred to as the sea.

      Delete
  40. Such a shame that the museums were closed, I bet they'd have been fascinating. Still, you managed to see Uruguay as it actually is, I don't think you actually do see a place unless you take some back streets and get out of town. The colours in the cafe look so typical of South America. How did you find the food in Uruguay?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We tended to regard the closure of the museums as just one of those things and then went on to do something else. We were of course fortunate to have with us Rafaelito, who is from Uruguay, which made all the difference when seeking out unusual sights to be seen.

      Delete
  41. Dear Jane and Lance,

    There are so many comments here nowadays that I live in fear that my unassuming little contribution will be trodden on by a compliment-bent rhinoceros, but I merely wanted to welcome you back; our blogging community missed your indefatigable charm and dash. You have clearly spent your absent year just as I would have predicted: doing far more admirable things that typing into the 'new post' box. And Jane, in these recent images, looks less scary than my previous unknowing mental image, but just as chic.

    Long may you reign over world culture.

    Your friend,
    Mise

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dearest Mise,

      What a delight to have your comment. If anything could be contrived to make our weekend, then it is this. Wonderful, and yet more wonderful! And you are so very complimentary, causing us to blush.

      Indeed our year's absence has been filled with the most marvellous happenings but we have, in all truth, so missed our friends in the Blogosphere, and you especially. What joy, therefore, to be reconnected.

      Jó hétvégét!

      Delete
  42. Oh I really love that cobbles street! And also that Christmas tree in that open doorway :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christmas trees everywhere at the height of summer seemed to us so extraordinary and a little incongruous. Such is the Southern Hemisphere!

      Delete
  43. I emphasise - we have an uncanny knack of turning up on the very day that museums/galleries/gardens are closed..... even in this country. I always say to myself, must check on the web site, then say 'oh no, it'll be fine' and it isn't. Uruguay looks so interesting. Have you seen the 'Battle of the River Plate' with Peter Finch?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are rather pleased to think that we are not alone in turning up to places which we expect to be open but are in fact closed. In this instance it was complete misinformation.

      Uruguay is indeed most interesting. No, we cannot recall the film but will now go and Google it.

      Delete
  44. The cobble stone streets warm our hearts. . .we will follow one any where, any day. And of course we arrive when museums are closed or just following some festival or just before some new place opens. Timing is everything and yet not so important, isn't it? Serendipity often provides the best experiences. Loved this post. Jackie xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Jackie [and Joel], for we think of you as the Expeditionary Force of the Blogosphere and where you both lead, others follow! Certainly you must be amongst the most travelled and how wonderful is that. You are so right though about timing which is never a certainty in a foreign land.

      Jó hétvégét!

      Delete
  45. Oh my! The photos and your description seem right out of a delicious, afternoon reverie. How very inviting the cobbled streets are and how I would love a leisurely stroll with my heels going clickety-clack. The stillness of a summer day and the quiet riverside somehow remind me of many a vacation at grandma's old house. Sweet!

    And befriending stray cats? Just the kind of thing I would love in a place like this. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How very, very kind of you, Suman. The cobbled streets were most attractive as were so many of the old houses which lined them. How lovely to be reminded of your grandmother's house. A possible post, we wonder?

      We can never totally pass by cats; we love them all.

      Delete
  46. Dearhearts, Public transport! Oh the horrors. I hope the bus ride didn't cause you too much distress. Love the café, there's a real sense of theatre about it One can imagine Gloria Estefan popping in for a quick shake of her maracas. The cobbled street would have made me feel homesick.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A little confession called for here, Mitzi. Since giving up the motor cars [simply surplus to requirements], we do rather embrace public transport and one does find such a nice class of person on the buses!!

      The café was huge fun. All that vibrant colour - such a refreshing change from 'Magnolia'!!

      Now, as for cobbled streets......perhaps in your part of the world [along with Hovis]!!

      Delete
  47. I remember from geography lessons that the River Plate is wide - I don't remember anyone ever showing us just how wide. It was worth waiting 40 odd years for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we seem to think that we might have been taught something about it as, indeed, it was necessary in our day to know every Capital city, every river and mountain, and possibly other things too.

      Delete
  48. That final image is just perfection! I chuckled at the bit about painting your lips red. Crying shame that more than one venue was shuttered for the summer holidays but such is life, no? We greet the moment as it presents itself and don't pause to mourn closed doors--only to toast the opened ones.

    Lovely, lovely post. Enjoyed it over a piping cup of pinon coffee on a grey Pacific Northwest morning.

    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The last picture was almost taken by chance - we too think it great fun. As for the lipstick, a cheap replacement to replace the one in the stolen handbag, and we all at one point had a go as it was really rather a terrible colour and served to shock passers-by!!

      How wonderful to think of your reading this whilst drinking your morning coffee. xxx

      Delete
    2. Lipstick is entirely a matter of luck. There's no predicting when one will hit upon the perfect tube which will doubtless prove impossible to maintain for any satisfying amount of time. I'm sure there's something of value in that metaphor. Somewhere. Under all that nonsense. ;) Perhaps it is best to simply be content with stunning passers-by.

      Delete
    3. Perhaps we take a secret delight in 'stunning' passers-by, Suze. But it is to be hoped that it is never done with any unkind intention.

      Delete
  49. It looks so hot in these photographs. They have a heavy stillness that suggests great heat. But cooler by the river perhaps? Are you heat lovers, or do you prefer cool days I wonder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At times it was almost too hot to be outside, Annie, especially in the middle part of the day. Normally we should say that we do not much care for the heat, and certainly not the extreme heat, but unusually we rather enjoyed it. Perhaps we are conditioned to thinking of December as a cold month and there it is not!!

      Delete
  50. The views of the River Plate and of the Art Deco architecture are stunning! My husband's parents will be going on a cruise around part of South America later this year - I will be sending them the link to your blog so they can catch a glimpse of the sights they might see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We certainly found the River Plate to be truly majestic and are sure that your husband's parents will find much of interest on their cruise around South America.

      Thank you so much for rejoining as a Follower. It is so good to see the little car in our list once more.

      Delete
  51. I'm sure that your off the tracks travels, stories and pictures provide great fulfillment.

    And thanks for visiting as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Certainly we do derive great enjoyment and much fun simply from living life. In this we feel to be hugely privileged.

      Thank you so much for joining us along the way as a Follower.

      Delete
  52. Hello there! It's wonderful to finally get here and I apologise for my lateness, your blog is incredible and I am going to love following your wonderful adventures to these most beautiful places, I just think you are brilliant! have a lovely weekend x x x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are delighted to welcome you, Sandra, and how kind of you to be so enthusiastic about our blog which, like most, is simply a little bit of fun.

      And we wish you the happiest of weekends!

      Delete
  53. The photograph of the cobbled street suggests a time when life moved at a much slower pace. It's calming just to look at that scene. Incidentally, I like Lance's hat! It appears both stylish and practical.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, Mark, the entire town appeared to us not to belong to the modern world. Everything moved at a very slow pace which, in reality, was rather reassuring. The hat, a Panama, was bought in Budapest!

      Delete
  54. These photos of Colonia make me so homesick for Buenos Aires :)
    The cobblestones, the trees, the warm sunshine .. oh do I wish I were there !
    besitos, Candice .. in a cold and snowy place .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Poor you, Candice. We do know how you must feel seeing the images from South America. We suspect that at present you are not sure where you would wish to be. And that is totally understandable.

      Delete
    2. Yes .. Buenos Aires would soothe my broken heart but it also is warm . I have had my fill of cold snowy days and I keep getting invitations to visit friends in Argentina. I wonder if I can bring the kitten :)

      Delete
    3. If at all possible, and you are without other commitments, then go and see your friends in Buenos Aires. It would do you good. Possibly you could take the kitten [try to find out] or, if not, perhaps there is someone who would look after her for you for a short while.

      Delete
  55. Simply enchanting. Being in -south America.
    The old cobble stones remind me of our old village streets here.
    It sounds like a wonderful adventure as always ..
    Thank you Jane and Lance.
    happy days
    val x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We actually were totally captivated by the whole of Uruguay, or certainly all that we saw, and especially Colonia del Sacramento which is the most delightful of towns with the cobbled streets making it particularly special.

      Delete
  56. Dear, dear Jane! How thrilling to almost feel the warm breeze from your pages here, the sunshine of a land I do not know, of a people yet to communicate with ! The cobbled streets have so much beauty and history paved on them, and what a joy it is for you to be able to travel as such. Thank you for coming back to Blogland to share!

    I thank you kindly for coming this morning to visit. I am thrilled that I am in print, a goal I've had for a while. Now it's a matter of continuing to contribute and to improve to a level that I hope will allow me to be a professional. I loved what you said about your monochromatic wardrobe; me too, I love black and white and wear it incessantly, even in summer, but with a pop of color, what a difference it makes!

    Pink or any other color is truly a state of mind as well. May your days be filled with colors beyond the rainbow! Peace and beauty to you and Lance, Anita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are so very thrilled that, through the post, you are able to feel the warmth of Uruguay which is not at all restricted, as you remark, to the climate alone. Indeed, the people are so wonderfully friendly and it is they who beckon again.

      We both always enjoy your posts enormously both for their tremendous creative variety and interest. Yes, black and white has much to commend it, and not only for clothes!

      From a warm, spring-like day in Budapest we both send our very best wishes.

      Delete
  57. What an interesting post and I just love the photos. I am surprised that you were even sold a book of tickets for the museums, surely you should have been warned that they were all closed!! Have a good week Diane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We were, it must be confessed, slightly bewildered to find ourselves armed with a book of tickets for all of the museums only to find them closed. But such, it would appear, is life.

      Delete
  58. Dearest Jane and Lance
    I hope you don't mind I took a bus to end of your comments, which luckily for me the bus driver let me off on route to enjoy... Your blog itself is delightful, and I absolutely loved my little journey with you through the wonders of Uruguay but on account of me only having an economy ticket I am slow arriving... So I will limit my time to admiring the warmth of readership and camaraderie that you have with your fellow Bloggers. I can see why, as in the little time that we have known each other, your return visits show an interest in others and their posts which is warm and genuine.
    Have a great week!
    Wren x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dearest Wren:

      This is so very kind, sweet and amusing of you. As we are certain that you find yourself, the Blogosphere really does act to bring people together from across the globe and where very real friendships, in a virtual world, can be established and maintained. We are so fortunate to have many, many wonderful connections and, on occasion, to meet with friends who have only previously been known through the blog. Such is the joy of life and in such a manner are our lives enriched immeasurably. Thank you for taking the time and trouble to write and for the response which you made by email.

      Delete
  59. What an interesting life you lead over the past year - it must have certainly broadened your horizons and given you plenty to blog about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Previously we had never travelled outside of Europe, Elaine, so we did regard our Uruguay trip as a very big adventure.

      Delete
  60. Dear Jane and Lance,

    What an eloquent account of your travels through Colonia del Sacramento, with its quaint cobblestone streets, brightly coloured interiors and charmingly rustic taverns. Pity that you could not visit its museums; I felt so sad for you, carrying around those tickets that promised peeks into the country's history and culture. But, more time spent at the pebbly coastline, where the sunlight soothed tired feet and replenished already enriched souls.

    Lovely to travel with you. Thanks for leading the way through this intriguing journey.

    Wishing you a wonderful week!

    Poppy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Poppy, for your concern but in the end the fact that we did not see the museums did not matter too much and did not detract from the overall enjoyment of the day.

      We had great fun on the beach both in Colonia del Sacramento and in Montevideo where we were actually staying.

      Delete
  61. That cobbled street reminded me so much of my very own Trinidad, another World Heritage town. Beautiful photos. Many thanks.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trinidad we do not know and it sounds, as a World Heritage Site, to be most attractive. There are so many places of interest to see and never the time to do them all.

      Greetings from Budapest!!

      Delete
  62. Greetings humans, Jane and Lance,

    And then, I had to scroll down to the comments section using my paws. Think about trying to scroll down using mittens and you will understand. I think my situation beats the bus comment! :)

    Right then, my dear human friends. And thus, the wonders of your Uruguay, your adventure, your journey, doth fill the eyes of this curious dog. I'm pawfoundly grateful to look at this. My human, Gary has told me he has been to Sacramento. I told him he misread your article. This is not about the one in California, I told my silly human. It's this one, Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, Penny, you are absolutely right. The Sacramento to which Gary has been is, almost certainly, in California, not in South America, and that most likely without you. Shame!!

      However, if ever you get the chance to go, then do so. We met many lovely potential friends for you!!

      Delete
  63. There's something so joyous and melancholy at once in these former colonial outposts. I'm very envious of your trip there and enjoying your wonderful pictures and larks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do so agree with you here. Strangely, Uruguay was under British rule for a very short period, barely six months, in the early C19!!

      Delete
  64. Hello Jane and Lance

    What a delightful surprise to see your comment on my blog this morning. I imagine you came across my blog via ELS?

    It was very refreshing to read your post today and have a peek into your adventures. I think I'm going to like it over here. Will call again.

    Trish

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How really splendid, Trish, to be connected in this way and yes, we did come across you, most happily, via ELS.

      We are so pleased that you have enjoyed the post and thank you not only for saying but also for becoming a Follower. You are most welcome.

      Delete
  65. Thoroughly enjoying each and every word and picture of this post and dreaming of course!
    Best wishes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much. You are always so generous in all that you say.

      Delete
    2. Honestly reading your every post is a joy, I am saying this very sincerely (no flattery involved).
      Best wishes

      Delete
  66. I can't believe all the museums are closed during the summer??!!! That's when tourists visit, right? Nevertheless, how wonderful to enjoy the warmth, charm and character of this old town. And the sunshine, of course!
    Cheers,
    Loi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Something not dissimilar happens here too, Loi. At the height of the tourist season in August many of the theatres, the opera, ballet and numerous museums take a break! But the warmth on our backs in December was simply wonderful.

      Delete
  67. What a place! I've never been to Uruguay, or South America for that matter. And can't even imagine a river 60 miles wide. The old town looks utterly delightful and I love that last pic..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As this was our first time outside of Europe, everything was very new and exciting. The River Plate, where it flows into the South Atlantic, is more like the sea than a river!

      Thank you so much for your comment; we shall hope to welcome you again.

      Delete
  68. Dear Ones,
    Through pictorials and verse you have once again transported us along on wonderful journey as if by magic carpet. Your imaging of Colonia del Sacramento makes one feel as though you have introduced us to a grand Condesa of South American linage. And even as time has stripped her youth away she still sits properly to receive our traveling trio. How both envious and happy I am that you were able to experience her embrace. – gary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so very, very kind, Gary. We love your metaphor, which fits so perfectly, of Colonia del Sacramento, as some faded aristocrat clinging on to former glory and ourselves as a travelling trio!!

      If ever you have the opportunity to visit Uruguay, then do go. You would be as enchanted as we were and are.

      Delete
  69. Great photographs. I almost feel as if I have been traveling with you. I like how you added a bit of tutorials under each photograph. It made the journey more realistic. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for this compliment. Unlike yourself we are complete amateurs when it comes to taking photographs and have only the most basic of cameras.

      Delete
  70. Dearest Jane and Lance,
    I can imagine your disappointment to find that the museums were closed! Now you absolutely MUST come back! :)
    But what magical images you share with us....life is all about what you make it...and it is more than evident that your lives are ART.

    The gnarly trees, cobblestone streets, that gorgeous coast...all so delicious...my favorite is the picture of you two, sweethearts,...and Rafaelitos footsies! :) I love the whimsy...
    I am dreaming right along with you here...

    And I have a "thing" for polka dots..that cafe looks like great fun!
    I hope the meal was delicious...
    Oh, how I would love it if someday you could publish your travel essays! Brilliant... :)
    A splendid week to you!
    Is Spring making an appearance yet?
    Much love,
    - Irina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, Irina, the closure of the museums, as you rightly say, was a disappointment but then one does have to be philosophical about such things and carry on, which is exactly what we did!! As for returning, we are already intending to go back to Uruguay at the end of the year, something to which we are much looking forward.

      The final photograph, taken by chance and which we almost did not include, is great fun and captures a particularly happy, relaxing moment.

      Irina, the café was such a joy. How you would have loved it. We had coffee there having had an excellent lunch in another restaurant.

      Yes, finally spring is appearing here and this week although the early mornings have been cold they have turned out beautifully warm and sunny. Tomorrow we leave for a few days to our flat in Brighton [no internet] where we hope it will be equally nice.

      Take care. Love. xxx

      Delete
  71. How disappointing that the museum was closed for the summer holidays; does that make sense? I like the vibrant colors in the small restaurant and the colorful table cloths, etc. Thanks for taking us on this tour via your blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was indeed very strange that the museums should be closed, particularly after we had purchased tickets. Such is life!! The small restaurant, where we had coffee, was great fun in every respect, not least the décor!

      Delete
  72. Oh, I feel as if I have been swept away by the warmth of Uruguay and left longing for the museum treasures hidden away behind locked doors. I know that you will enjoy them doubly in December for being denied in the heat of summer.

    This excursion provides such insight into the local daily life, a view of the real people of this area. The colorful fabrics and eclectic decor are beautifully captured in your photos. The cobblestone streets are ageless and give the appearance that you had all of the Old Town to yourselves.

    How I would love to refuse souvenirs, take many photographs, and bien sûr, paint my lips red! The last photo is creative and totally priceless! I love it and congratulate Rafael on this winner.

    What fun you three had, and I wish you a great trip to Brighton.

    Love to all,
    Genie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, as you will realise, Genie, that wonderful warmth of Uruguay was in fact in December which is summer [something we could not quite become used to] there, an escape from the cold of a Budapest winter.

      South America is, in our somewhat limited experience, extraordinarily colourful and has a vibrancy, which we loved, which is very different from that of Europe. Certainly, as you say, the cobblestone streets give an antique feel which is utterly charming. Surprisingly there were very few people about.

      We are certain that you would have delighted in it all and what fun we should all have had together. But if not in Uruguay, then we must make it happen in Budapest!!

      Take care and we shall return after Brighton. Our love to you. J, L, & R. xxx

      Delete
  73. I always thought Buenos Aires would be a fabulous place to travel to. I enjoyed all your pictures

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly, we only saw Buenos Aires from across the water; we very much hope to visit that city on our next trip in December.

      Delete
  74. I love the old world character of this beautiful town. I want to sit down and have a cup of tea at the colorful cafe. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Colonia del Sacramento was full of character not only with its cobbled streets leading down to the sea but also its wealth of ancient buildings. The café was great fun, Sarah.

      Delete
  75. Dear Jane and Lance,
    How absolutely sublime. Time seems to have indeed "stood still". I love these places, they make one feel intrepid. I can almost smell and hear this place. It's a nice dream as I sit in foggy Wales this morning. I shall close my eyes, feel the heat on my face and hear the serenade of crickets and cicadas. Thanks for the dream.
    Di
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right, Di, there was a great sense of time having "stood still". Surprisingly, as we somewhat wilt in extreme heat, we loved enjoying the warmth of a South American summer whilst in the middle of a European winter, so to speak!

      Delete
  76. Hello Jane and Lance,

    Beautiful photographs that give me a balmy hint of Summer as I sit here in rural England. I particularly liked your photo of the interior of the small café, in all its colours.

    As for the mistake of buying a whole booklet of tourist tickets and then finding virtually every museum in town firmly closed, this happened to me last summer in Ulaan Batar: outraged, I took all my clothes off in the street and screamed at the top of my voice "DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM?" and rapped on the solid door with my stiletto heel.

    I had some degree of success in gaining admission to a museum, not before I was carted off to a dank cell.

    Hope you will post again soon with more photos of your travels.

    Fanny xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was, as you may imagine, Fanny, the colours of the café which drew us in. But then we thought the whole of Uruguay, or that which we saw, so very vibrant in every respect compared with the often dull drabness of the United Kingdom.

      Darling, would that we had been wearing stilettos, then we should of course have followed your example in Ulaan Batar where, as we understand it, they have a very nice class of prisoner. Cannot vouch for the same in Uruguay! As it was we were Mr. Mr. and Mrs. DISSATISFIED from the equivalent of Tunbridge Wells!!

      Delete
  77. This place looks so exotic and atmospheric...Wish I could travel so far away and discover other cultures, landscapes, cuisine...Closed museums on holidays, it sounds absurd but I know it happens...Thank you for sharing this unique experience with us!
    Warm regards,
    Olympia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was our first time outside of Europe, Olympia, and so very exciting to note all the differences of which there were indeed many. But we loved it all and are planning to return at the end of this year.

      Delete
  78. Hey Jane and Lance!
    The new movie, I think is called "Grand Budapest Hotel", just wondering, did they get the idea from your blog, or did they use you as consultants for the film? Do tell!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alas, the film was, apparently, shot entirely in Germany but is based very loosely upon the Corinthia Grand Hotel here in Budapest.

      Delete
  79. My dearest Jane and Lance,

    The view of the sea, the colours and your beautiful summery floppy sunhats were spectacularly cinema graphic and magical! I feel transported to the exotic island with quaint cafes on the cobbled streets like in the scenes from François Truffaut's film "Jules and Jim". I hope you are having a wonderful week. After many days of sunshine, it goes back to clouds and rain here. It seems so typical as I happened to take Friday off to have a long weekend. No such luck, I'm afraid, with this weather. At any rate, it's so nice to see the daffodils shaking their heads in the pouring rain.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Best wishes, ASD

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We loved it all, dearest ASD, as you will imagine and found it so excitingly different from the Europe which we know. A return visit is planned for the end of this year.

      Just returned from a few days in Brighton where, after weeks of dismal weather, the sun shone, it was warm and we really felt the onset of spring. Indeed, we had vases of daffodils placed around the flat which added additional joy to our lives.

      Delete
  80. Wonderful! I must say it raised a smile to think of museums closed for the summer holidays, just when people are going to want to visit! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was exceedingly strange that we should be sold a set of tickets, Jenny, only to find the museums then closed. Perhaps it makes good business sense - take the money but provide nothing in return!!

      Delete
  81. You give such a strong sense of the colourful difference of South America in this post, Jane and Lance. Such a shame the museums were all closed, but it gives you the perfect excuse for another visit at a different time of year. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We were so struck with the many differences we discovered between Europe and South America, Perpetua, which made for a refreshing change when, so often, wherever one goes there is much which is far too familiar. We are certainly planning to return.

      Delete
  82. How lovely to be taken away to the vibrant colours of a country I have never visited. I could almost feel the heat of the drowsy afternoon! I loved the last beach photograph, it made me smile and I too love to search for sea shells... Jane xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was our first excursion outside of Europe, Jane, and so was something of an adventure. We loved the heat, a real escape from our own winter, although Christmas Day with temperatures of nearly 40C did seem very odd indeed.

      Delete
  83. Thank you for the tour, it's so lovely to see new places via blog land. So sad that the museums were closed for summer...what an odd idea! It's taken me ages to get over to your blog, but I'm so glad I came along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is indeed fun to explore different areas of the globe from, as one might put it, one's armchair. Something we too much appreciate about the Blogosphere.

      We are delighted to welcome you here and trust that we may see you again.

      Delete
  84. What a lovely time you've had (of course, I had some knowledge, from the FB posts, but it's quite another thing to have it put altogether here).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was all hugely enjoyable, Susan, with much that was completely new to us and far beyond previous experiences.

      Delete
  85. Dear Jane and Lance

    Thank you for this wonderful virtual tour of Uruguay and South America - a place I've never visited - isn' Blogland great - you can be swept away to many exciting places!

    How very odd that the museums are closed for the summer, that must have been such a disappointment. Its happened to us on a few occasions, but just on a Monday or something, not for the whole summer! I suppose that just goes to show how laid back they are.

    I love the last photo!

    Jeanne
    x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laid back, Jeanne, is a complete understatement and we loved it all!
      So very un-British.

      Yes, we too love the way in which one can be transported around the world during a blogging session. One never knows where one is going to end up and one learns so much in the process.

      Delete
  86. I thought you had given up blogging and only dropped by on a whim so I am delighted to see you again. Welcome back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Real life has, happily, been the only reason which has kept us from the Blogosphere. It is so good to be back in touch with all our virtual friends.

      Thank you, Elizabeth, for the warm welcome!

      Delete
  87. Isn't it wonderful to visit places you have never been or are unlikely to visit through posts like these. Thank you so much for the tour. Love your blog and thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment about the dogs. We are feeling a little better now, but still missing him terribly, going for walks is not the same!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we too love to travel vicariously through the experiences of others. Uruguay was a complete eye-opener for us in so many ways but we shall travel back there in December and are already excited about the prospect of it all.

      The loss of a pet is always hard to bear but it surely is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.

      Delete
  88. I am simultaneously in awe of your sense of adventure and in rapture at your words and pictures. Far be it from me to disagree with Ratty, but I would say that there is nothing—absolute nothing—half so much worth doing as TRAVELING!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is exceedingly generous and kind of you, Kim. We do love seeking out new places, where adventures of one sort or another usually wait, but find the actual travelling somewhat tiresome.

      Delete

Your comments are warmly welcomed and appreciated. We shall reply to each one individually since we value establishing a dialogue. However, we do not publish anonymous comments.

PLEASE NOTE: On occasion when comments are in excess of 200, then it is necessary to click on 'Load More' to view all comments that have been left.